The United States on Wednesday offered a reward of up to $5 million each for fugitive Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony and some of his top aides in the Lord’s Resistance Army rebel group.

Mr.Kony, who has been accused of terrorizing northern Uganda for 20 years and was ejected from the country along with his rebel group in 2005, is wanted by the International Criminal Court. The warlord and a few hundred followers are now believed to roam the remote jungle straddling the borders of South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic. His guerrillas are accused of abducting children to use as fighters and sex slaves, and of hacking off victims’ limbs as a method of intimidation and revenge.
The State Department said that Mr. Kony, along with aides identified as Okot Odhiambo and Dominic Ongwen, had been cited under the department’s newly expanded War Crimes Rewards Program. Under the program, the State Department offers rewards of up to $5 million for information leading to the arrest, transfer or conviction of such fugitives.

From Newyork Times

The ballot looked like a rebus puzzle, with pictures of a bicycle, a boom box, a key, a soccer ball, a yellow rose, a giraffe, a hoe — all colorful symbols for Uganda's various political parties. Moses Kibwami, a carpenter and the father of 12, stood there in his swamp boots on Friday morning, cast a quick look over them and then stamped his thumb onto the paper.

"I'm voting for change," he said.

Mr. Kibwami, along with many others here in Uganda's capital, voted for the leading opposition candidate, Kizza Besigye, who is trying to unseat President Yoweri Museveni, in power for the past 25 years. But while the opposition has made some inroads into urban areas, Mr. Museveni was running strong in the countryside, where the vast majority of Uganda's voters live.

This country of about 33 million people is holding presidential and parliamentary elections, and the voting mostly seemed to proceed in an orderly, albeit slow, fashion on Friday, with millions flocking to the polls starting at the crack of dawn.

Ugandans living in the Diaspora have asked government to enact a law that enables them to cast their votes from abroad.

The chairperson of Ugandans living in the Nordic countries, Eddie Bazira said that they are pushing for this legislation ahead of the 2016 general elections.

"As we count down to 50 years of Independence, we want to express displeasure at the way government seems to ignore us inspite of our large contribution towards the country's annual Gross Domestic Product," Bazira said.

He was addressing Journalists at the Uganda at 50 Nordics offices at former Equatorial hotel in Kampala over the weekend.

 

Counting is under way in Uganda after the country voted in a poll in which President Yoweri Museveni is hoping to extend his 25 years in office.

Voting was mostly smooth but a journalist was shot when troops opened fire at an opposition politician.

Mr Museveni's former doctor, Kizza Besigye, is standing against him for the third time and has warned of protests if he is "cheated" of victory.

But Mr Museveni said Egyptian-style protests could not happen in Uganda.

Oil has recently been discovered in Uganda and one of the main issues has been how to spend the income which is set to start flowing in the coming years.

Counting is under way in Uganda after the country voted in a poll in which President Yoweri Museveni is hoping to extend his 25 years in office.

Voting was mostly smooth but a journalist was shot when troops opened fire at an opposition politician.

Mr Museveni's former doctor, Kizza Besigye, is standing against him for the third time and has warned of protests if he is "cheated" of victory.

But Mr Museveni said Egyptian-style protests could not happen in Uganda.

Oil has recently been discovered in Uganda and one of the main issues has been how to spend the income which is set to start flowing in the coming years.

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